compass-3I hope it’s understood that when I tease about directional dyslexia, I am not making fun of people who have a genuine neurological brain disorder, with whom I am quite sympathetic, and try to help. (The Special Programs office at my college sends me students with learning disabilities because they know I care about them, although I can’t always tutor them personally, and some are shy.)

Population Density in Southern California

Population Density in Southern California

A friend of mine who teaches 3rd grade went to a special workshop on dyslexia Saturday (“1 in 5 Americans”), and sent “Bright Solutions for Dyslexia,” http://www.dys-add.com. The directionality symptoms are discussed very clearly:

“Most dyslexic children and adults have significant directionality confusion.
Left–Right confusion:
Even adults have to use whatever tricks their mother or teacher taught them to tell left from right. It never becomes rapid and automatic.
A common saying in households with dyslexic people is, “It’s on the left. The other left.”
That’s why they are b–d confused. One points to the left and one points to the right.
They will often start math problems on the wrong side, or want to carry a number the wrong way.
Up–Down confusion:
Some children with dyslexia are also up-down confused. They confuse b–p or d–q, n–u, and m–w.
Confusion about directionality words:
First–last, before–after, next–previous, over–under
Yesterday–tomorrow (directionality in time)
North, South, East, West confusion:
Adults with dyslexia get lost a lot when driving around, even in cities where they’ve lived for many years
Often have difficulty reading or understanding maps.”

http://www.dys-add.com/dyslexia.html#anchorSymptomsDirectionality